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Estate Planning Archives

An example of what a will might look like

For most people, the idea of a will is understood long before actually considering a will is necessary. If nothing else, most people have likely had experience with the wills of loved ones in which they were beneficiaries. However, just because you understand what a will is meant to do does not mean that you know what a will looks like, and when it comes time to consider your own will, you may be curious to know what you can expect.

What information should I consider when planning my estate?

Estate planning is one of the most comprehensive legal actions that an individual can take. Because it oversees the legal ramifications of your entire estate, including all of your assets, it requires a great deal of information to be considered and compiled by you, your spouse and possibly your children. Additionally, because this wealth of information must be properly managed in order to ensure that your estate plan is legal, it is essential to enlist the aid of an attorney and to share this information with your attorney.

Advanced directives and moving

If you have an advanced directive in place and are considering moving, be aware that different state laws could jeopardize what you have in place in your living will or directive. Advanced directives and living wills, including healthcare by proxy, are regulated on a state level, which means if you created your directive in one state and then relocated to another state, you may find your directive is not allowed, at all or in part. Therefore, you will always want to review or revise your advanced directive and will when moving in order to better ensure it conforms to state law.

No trust for the Prince's ransom

April saw the passing of an icon. Someone so unique and so creative that few realized how far-reaching his words were until his death. And now, with the musical legacy Prince leaves behind, the courts are in a flurry determining what becomes of his estate and his monetary legacy. It has been estimated to be as high as half a billion dollars. Surprisingly, a circuit court judge announced there doesn't appear to be any form of an estate plan to indicate to whom he would like to transition that legacy (and all its trimmings) to.

Why would I need a living will?

We all hope that when our time comes it will not include a lot of suffering. Naturally, we would like to extend that same courtesy to our loved ones, who may endure significant emotional and financial suffering should we need to be put on life support. This is one area where a living will can allow us to dictate our wishes, taking the heavy decisions out of the hands of our beloved friends and family and allowing us the dignity of a decisive death. 

How do I leave money to my child without jeopardizing his SSI?

If you have a child with a disability, whether cognitive or physical or both, and you have relatively significant assets that you want to leave to them when you die, you may need to set up a special needs trust.

Estate planning in Florida includes more than you may think

When most people in Florida think about estate planning, they think about wills. While wills are, perhaps, the most commonly used estate planning document, a will is not only the only document you may need for comprehensive estate planning. In fact, multiple documents are usually needed to ensure an individual?s long-term plans are guaranteed.

Do beneficiaries of living trusts have rights in Florida?

When Florida residents decide to make loved ones beneficiaries of living trusts, many of those listed as beneficiaries are unsure of their rights. Fortunately, information is available that outlines beneficiaries' rights that can help eliminate this uncertainty. So, exactly what rights do beneficiaries have?

A charitable trust in an estate plan can lead to disputes

Some people in Florida decide to create charitable trusts as a way to leave the fruits of their labors to organizations they support. Unfortunately, sometimes a decedent?s decision to include a charitable trust as part of his or her estate plan can lead to disputes after his or her death. When charitable disputes arise, the help of a legal professional is often required, as these disputes can be quite complex.

Medicaid planning among most common elder law issues

When you think about your future, do you think about your medical care? If not, perhaps it is time to begin. As Florida residents live longer lives, the concern about future medical care has become one of the most common elder law issues in the state. Medicaid planning is one way to ensure your future medical care, especially should the need for long-term care arise, does not leave your estate depleted.

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