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What are common ways that Florida doctors breach their contracts?

A study conducted by Today's Hospitalist shows that at least 70% of all physicians leave their first employer within at least two years of starting their job. Many of them do so to take on a more exciting opportunity elsewhere. They're often so eager to start the new role that they don't take time to closely review their employment contract. This results in many doctors being sued for breach of contract.

There are some common reasons physicians find themselves embroiled in legal battles with their former employers.

First job changeup

Doctors are often so eager to land a job that they jump at the first employment offer that's extended to them. Job offers may continue to pour in, though. If something comes up that's more ideal, then a physician may decide to accept another offer instead. If they've previously signed a contract, then the doctor may be sued when they let the employer know that they no longer wish to work there.

Not adhering to termination provisions

Doctors also get sued for breach of contract for not providing adequate notice to their employer of their departure. Most contracts have provisions that require doctors to provide up to several months notice of their departure from their role. If they don't provide that, then they may be sued for violating their contract.

Violations of non-compete clauses

Doctors often get sued for breach of contract because they take up future employment that violates its non-compete clauses. Many physicians don't realize that in addition to being restricted from practicing medicine, they're also can't do consulting or teach in the same in the area either.

Breaches of contracts can be costly for both medical practices and physicians. Doctors may lose money fighting these lawsuits. Since medical practices invest significant monetary and other resources in recruiting doctors, they don't tend to look too fondly upon those who violate their contracts.

Doctors can avoid breaching their contract with their employer by sitting down with an attorney before signing a contract to learn about the provisions contained within it. They can also consult with one before leaving a job to make sure that they're not violating it.

A breach of contract attorney can review your contract for you and, if necessary, help you defend yourself against your employer if you've been sued for violating the terms of your work agreement.

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