Material and immaterial contract breaches

If you are dissatisfied by low quality work conducted by a construction worker or if the work was not completed in a timely manner, you’ll probably feel quite angry and frustrated by the issue. Issues in the completion of the project may have had implications for your personal life or for the running of your business, and this is why it is wise to consider taking legal action.

It is important that you gather as much information as you can about the nature of the work that took place and when it was completed. This will help you to put forward a convincing case when claiming that the contract was breached.

The difference between material and immaterial contract breaches

There are two main types of contract breaches: material and immaterial. Immaterial contract breaches mean that the contract was breached but no actual damages or consequences resulted. An example of an immaterial breach could be when phase 1 of the project was said to be completed by a certain date. If phase 1 of the project was delayed but phase 2 became more time-efficient and caught up with the final deadline, it is likely that this contract breach would be deemed as immaterial.

However, if the final deadline of a project completion is delayed or the promised work is not carried out, this may have a financial impact on the running of a business, for example. In this case, the breach would be material and action should be taken.

If you are suffering due to a construction contract breach, it is important that you take action to get justice.

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